Renegade Molecules of the Week: TBHQ and Titanium Dioxide

Two molecules are in the news. No, it is not because they advance our sex lives or help us live longer. It is because recent studies suggest that they are dangerous. These renegades are tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) and titanium dioxide (TiO2). Why are these two additives suspect? Are the fears overblown? Why are they added in the first place? How will they affect my personal eating … Continue reading Renegade Molecules of the Week: TBHQ and Titanium Dioxide

Dueling visions of Big Ag

Big Ag! What is it good for? Absolutely Nothing! suggests Mark Bittman. Robert Paarlberg comes to Big Ag’s defense. Bittman gives his assessment on Big Ag and Big Food in Animal, Vegetable, Junk. Paarlberg counters him in Resetting the Table.  Rachel Laudan suggested these two books for us. They provide insight into threats and promises of modern agriculture and food technology. The downside of Big … Continue reading Dueling visions of Big Ag

Blaming American culture for the rise in obesity around the world

Obesity has America in its grip. It is spreading around the world. The United States of America inserts its presence into global culture. Its movies, marketing, and images travel across the seas. Love it or hate it, American culture penetrates even remote locations. The world population gets heavier. Last week we blamed processed food for the growing obesity crisis. The week before we chose not … Continue reading Blaming American culture for the rise in obesity around the world

Blaming processed foods for obesity

Last week I explored why we blame the fat person for being fat. I concluded that we need to be sensitive to the feelings of fat people. We should not shame them. They deserve the same respect as anyone else. This week we blame the food—processed food. I shift to the more technical term obesity when addressing processed food. Processed food is making America obese, … Continue reading Blaming processed foods for obesity

Blaming the person for being fat—What are the health risks?

News of the coronavirus pandemic overshadows earlier concerns about our expanding waistlines. Becoming old and becoming fat increases our chances for dying from COVID-19. In What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat, Aubrey Gordon tells us to back off. Some fat people accept their fatness. They don’t want our condemnation, our advice, or even our concern. Unless asked for help, we should … Continue reading Blaming the person for being fat—What are the health risks?

What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat

Aubrey Gordon writes a searing indictment of American culture. Her book is also a plea for understanding. What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat is a heartfelt description of her life as a “very fat person.” Those words are hers not mine. When we see a fat person, do we see a real person? Do we recoil or do we want to … Continue reading What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat

Draining the food swamp

Millions of Americans lack access to healthy food. Can one of the wealthiest nations in the world do better? Rigid definitions of healthy foods, meals, and diets obscure the problem. Differences in cultural heritage between dietary advisors and their clients block solutions. Affordability of healthy food items creates a gulf between haves and have nots. Swamps and deserts are only two terms that designate areas … Continue reading Draining the food swamp

Food Justice: Issues and Challenges

Food justice is part of the social justice initiative associated with “Progressive” politics. The New Food Movement advocates for food justice. For a taste of these ideas check out Food Justice, Black Food Matters, Feeding the Other, and More Than Just Food. My interest in this topic stems from my concern about food access for impoverished populations. I support some of these efforts and disagree … Continue reading Food Justice: Issues and Challenges

Closing the culture gap between client and provider by Constance Brown-Riggs

There’s no question that COVID-19 exacerbated the existing racial disparities in food insecurity. According to Feeding America in 2019, food insecurity among Black and white individuals was 19.3 percent and 9.6 percent, respectively. For 2021, projections for Black individuals are 21 percent compared to 11 percent of white individuals. The cultures of Black people seeking help with dietary issues and most dietitians providing it affects … Continue reading Closing the culture gap between client and provider by Constance Brown-Riggs